NATIONAL POTATO MONTH!

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With September, comes the colder temperatures so when I found that it’s National Potato Month, I knew I’d have to write about the wonderful eatable spuds.

 

This is what I found out, thanks to Wikipedia:

The potato is a starchytuberous crop from the perennial nightshade Solanum tuberosumPotato may be applied to both the plant and the edible tuber. Potatoes have become a staple food in many parts of the world and an integral part of much of the world’s food supply. Potatoes are the world’s fourth-largest food crop, following maize(corn), wheat, and rice. Tubers produce Glycoalkaloid in small amounts. If green sections (sprouts and skins) of the plant are exposed to light the tuber can produce a high enough concentration of glycoalkaloids to affect human health.

So now you know the scientific long and short of a potato.

Besides being a little fun to say, here’s so many ways to fix one.

First: you must say POTATO 3x really fast.  See? Wasn’t that kind of fun!

There’s boiling, mashing, baking, frying, deep frying, and salads to name a few. Let’s not forget soups, stews and the loveable potato skins and chips! There’s lots and lots of seasonings to spruce up the spuds. I love removing the done potato from the skin, mashing it with garlic, and then placing it back inside the skin!

Here’s a few good pictures to get your mouth watering and tummy ready for a good potato!

 

If you’d like to read more about me or purchase a book, here is the link to my website: Barb’s Books

LABOR DAY!!

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Labor Day is on the first Monday of September every year. It was originally organized to celebrate various labor unions’ strengths of and contributions to the United States’ economy.

About Labor Day

The first Labor Day was held in 1882. Its origins stem from the desire of the Central Labor Union to create a holiday for workers. It became a federal holiday in 1894. It was originally intended that the day would be filled with a street parade to allow the public to appreciate the work of the trade and labor organizations. After the parade, a festival was to be held to amuse local workers and their families. In later years, prominent men and women held speeches.This is less common now, but is sometimes seen in election years. One of the reasons for choosing to celebrate this on the first Monday in September, and not on May 1, which is common in the rest of the world, was to add a holiday in the long gap between Independence Day and Thanksgiving.

When I was a kid, we’d pack up and go for a drive up north. Sometimes, we’d visit farm relatives for the three day weekend, but not always. The farm was always fun because my brother and would climb on the haybales or else create havoc while our uncles did the milking. Since we lived in Minneapolis, the farm held much to discover and enjoy.

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However, Mom and Dad loved to fish. We’d load our fishing poles and off we’d go to a small lake north of Minneapolis near McGregor. We had relatives there, too, who had a cabin. That was always fun.

What does your family do for fun? How about visiting a National Park or go for a bike ride? Get out and enjoy the great outdoors and relish in the day. You deserve it!

You could sit outside and read a good book!

 

Here is the link to my website where you can find more good books!  Barb’s Books

MEMORIAL DAY

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It doesn’t take a hero to order men into battle. It takes a hero to be one of those men who goes into battle.

Norman Schwarzkopf quotes(U.S. Army officer who commanded Operation Desert Storm, b.1934)

 

From what I’ve learned, it’s apparent that the need for honoring our vets came from the women. Those who survived. It also began during and after the American Civil War. Both sides had a need to honor their dead. The women would mourn over the death of their husbands and lovers, sons and brothers, fathers and daughters. They’d decorate the graves. This is why it was first called: Decoration Day. Leave it to the women to start something to honor their heroes who’d stolen their hearts.

A hymn published in 1867, “Kneel Where Our Loves are Sleeping” by Nella L. Sweet carried the dedication “To The Ladies of the South who are Decorating the Graves of the Confederate Dead” (Source: Duke University’s Historic American Sheet Music, 1850-1920). While Waterloo N.Y. was officially declared the birthplace of Memorial Day by President Lyndon Johnson in May 1966, it’s difficult to prove conclusively the origins of the day.

 

The spontaneous gatherings of the women morphed into Memorial Day, and it was used as a means to unite the country, and was officially proclaimed on 5 May 1868 by General John Logan, national commander of the Grand Army of the Republic. It was first observed on 30 May 1868, when flowers were placed on the graves of Union and Confederate soldiers at Arlington National Cemetery. The first state to officially recognize the holiday was New York in 1873. By 1890 it was recognized by all of the northern states. The South refused to acknowledge the day, honoring their dead on separate days until after World War I (when the holiday changed from honoring just those who died fighting in the Civil War to honoring Americans who died fighting in any war).

It is now celebrated in almost every State on the last Monday in May (passed by Congress with the National Holiday Act of 1971 (P.L. 90 – 363) to ensure a three day weekend for Federal holidays).

In 1915, inspired by the poem “In Flanders Fields,”Moina Michael replied with her own poem:

We cherish too, the Poppy red
That grows on fields where valor led,
It seems to signal to the skies
That blood of heroes never dies.
She then conceived of an idea to wear red poppies on Memorial day in honor of those who died serving the nation during war.

Ms. Michael was the first to wear one, selling poppies to her friends and co-workers with the money going to benefit servicemen in need. Later a Madam Guerin from France was visiting the United States and learned of this new custom started by Ms.Michael and when she returned to France, made artificial red poppies to raise money for war orphaned children and widowed women.

This tradition spread to other countries. In 1921, the Franco-American Children’s League sold poppies nationally to benefit war orphans of France and Belgium. The League disbanded a year later and Madam Guerin approached the VFW for help. Shortly before Memorial Day in 1922 the VFW became the first veterans’ organization to nationally sell poppies. Two years later their “Buddy” Poppy programwas selling artificial poppies made by disabled veterans. In 1948 the US Post Office honored Ms Michael for her role in founding the National Poppy movement by issuing a red 3 cent postage stampwith her likeness on it.

The moral of this story: Behind every great man is an even greater woman!

You can read more about me on my website: Barb’s Books